Etymology of Shotteswell and the Coronation Tree

The Parish

Milestone

Milestone

 The Parish of Shotteswell lies on the extreme south easterly edge of the County of Warwickshire forming a peninsula and is surrounded on three sides by Oxfordshire.The parish comprises of 1,305 acres most of which is rich agricultural land, for the most part farmed by men who live in the village.  The village itself lies in the east slope of a small range of hills that runs north from Banbury and about 16 miles from Warwick, it is just of the B4100.The village boasts some extensive and beautiful views over the valley.

The Avon

The Avon, a tributary of the Cherwell separates the parish from Oxfordshire on the east, as does another small tributary on the west, the northern boundary being defined by an even smaller stream. The cottages and farms in the village are mainly constructed of Ferrunginous limestone – known as Hornton Stone .  The scientific name captures nothing of the rare qualities of Hornton stone which can range from a warm light brown colour through to a brown-purple, grey and green to various shades of mauve and blue.  A stone noted for its hard wearing properties and ease of working, it is little wonder that architects and artists have admired and used stone mined a the nearby Hornton quarries for centuries. Very few of the cottages remain thatched today; most of the original buildings are largely clustered around the church and forming steep and narrow lanes.

History of the name

The modern name Shotteswell seems to have been derived from the old English words “Scota” or Sceota”, meaning offshoot or brow of a hill with the word “well” added, they name has been spelt in the past in various ways of which the most common are “Cheteswell” and “Sacheswell”.  Old inhabitants sometimes refer to the village as “Satchell” giving perhaps a hint of how it used to be spelt or the accent of the locals!

This is our stunning view over our valley

This is our stunning view over our valley

The neighbouring village of Warmington (two miles further north) is mentioned in the Doomsday Book with a very large area of land and it would seem that the present parish of Shotteswell was in those days part of the parish of Warmington.

The first Lords of the Manor to be named were the Earls of Warwick and at one time, the Earl granted sub-Lordship o the ancestors of John de Dive.  He was followed by Robert Fitzworth, (1352) and later in the reign of King John, by the family of the Manards.  There is reference to a gift of six cottages by the Earl of Warwick to the Canon of Studley, but the reference is undated, as also is another gift by the Earl of Warwick to the Canon of Clattercote.  At any rate during the reign of Henry Viii, Sir Thomas Pope became the owner of the lands given to the monks of Studley and Clattercote and later obtained possession of the Manor and the Living.  This was at the same time as Sir Thomas Pope who founded Trinity College Oxford and became the owner of Wroxton Abbey

Coronation tree

The Manor passed to the North family who has since sold properties within the village.  Lord north planted the Coronation Tree (horse chestnut) junction of Middle Lane and Coronation Lane, to commemorate the coronation of King George V in June 1911.

Church view

Church view